PDI 1.5.2

the PDI data interface

FAQ

Compile PDI with Intel compiler

The Intel compiler is a complex beast for C++. It does not provide a full compilation environment but relies on GNU C++ library. Hence on a machine using environment modules (such as supercomputers), you will typically need to load a GCC module before using Intel C++ compiler. It is however fully compatible with the GNU compiler for C & C++. Only the Fortran compiler uses a different module format.

Attention
If you don't use PDI from Fortran, we strongly advise to compile PDI with GCC even if you compile the code that use PDI with Intel compiler.

Otherwise, to use PDI from a code compiled with ifort, you have 3 options (by order of recommendation):

  1. compile PDI in a fully GCC environment and load PDI with include instead of using the module,
  2. compile PDI with GCC for C/C++, only use Intel compiler for Fortran,
  3. compile PDI in a fully Intel environment, with GNU C++ library only.

load PDI with <tt>include</tt> instead of using the module

compile PDI with GCC for C/C++, use Intel compiler for Fortran

On a machine using environment modules you will need to load both GCC and Intel modules.

Then, compile PDI by specifying which compiler you want to use for each language to cmake. You can of course combine these option with the usual cmake options.

CC=gcc CXX=g++ FC=ifort cmake -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX="${HOME}/.local/" ..
make install

Even if you don't use it to compile your code, you must keep the GCC module loaded on a machine using environment modules.

compile PDI in a fully Intel environment, with GNU C++ library only

In order to use Intel compiler, you need to point it to an installation of GCC recent enough with the options:

  • -gcc-name=/path/to/gcc-7.5.0/bin/gcc,
  • -gxx-name=/path/to/gcc-7.5.0/bin/g++. These can be specified through the CFLAGS, CXXFLAGS and FFLAGS environment variables.

Then, compile PDI normally, you might want to force the use of Intel compilers. You can of course combine these option with the usual cmake options.

export CFLAGS="-gcc-name=/path/to/gcc-7.5.0/bin/gcc -gxx-name=/path/to/gcc-7.5.0/bin/g++"
export CXXFLAGS="${CFLAGS}"
export FFLAGS="${CFLAGS}"
export CC=icc
export CXX=icpc
export FC=ifort
cmake -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX="${HOME}/.local/" ..
make install

Even if you don't use it to compile your code, you must keep the GCC module loaded on a machine using environment modules.